MYSTIC MUSIC OF PAKISTAN - SOULFUL QAWWALI BY ABDUL NIAZI ENSEMBLE
Kabir Cultural Centre & Festival Accès Asie presents

MYSTIC MUSIC OF PAKISTAN - SOULFUL QAWWALI BY ABDUL NIAZI ENSEMBLE

In-person Event
May 14th 2022
8:00 pm – 10:00 pm / Doors: 7:30 pm

475, boulevard de Maisonneuve Est, Montréal, QC, Canada
For more information about this event, please contact Centre Culturel Kabir at info@centrekabir.com.

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Qawwali is a musical genre, popular in India and Pakistan, which expresses Sufi devotion. The word literally means “speech music” and originally comes from the Arabic qawwâl, a word meaning, “loquacious, who speaks well, who knows how to speak well”. This form of music has been made very popular in Europe and North America, thanks to the efforts of the inimitable Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, the gifted singer from Pakistan. The genre originated in 14th century India, and its founder was Amir Khusrau Dehlavi. Qawwali songs fall into two groups: hamd or manqabat which are devotional songs dedicated to Allah and ghazal which are secular songs which celebrate wine or love. A traditional qawwali ensemble usually consists of nine men: two lead singers who play the harmonium, five chorus singers who beat time with their hands, a tablâs player, and a dholak drummer. 

The songs usually last about fifteen minutes and are usually arranged in the following format: the main melody is generated on harmoniums, usually with improvised variations on this theme. Then comes an introduction called “âlâp”, where the singers intone different long notes from the râga which serves as a tonic base for the theme played. Then, the lead singer begins to sing the lines of the poem which constitute the lyrics of the song, accompanied by the only harmonium. The sung melodies are improvised following the structure of the chosen raga. After the lead singer's first exposition of the verse, another repeats it to a different improvised melody. A few verses, in varying numbers, are thus sung, so as to lead to the main heart of the song. This is when the song really begins: at this time, the tablâs and the dholak begin to play in rhythm, with the choir singers clapping their hands in rhythm, while all the members of the ensemble join in the singing. worms. The lyrics and the melodies associated with them are usually not improvised and are in fact very popular traditional songs. During the song, the lead singer and backing vocals can improvise a long tonal melody. The song experiences a rise in tempo and pathos, with each singer trying to outdo each other in terms of vocal arabesques. A few singers perform long periods of improvisation on the sargam, often in dialogue with an apprentice singer. Songs usually end abruptly. 

Refunds
Until the event starts
Exchanges
Until the event starts
Access for persons with mobility impairment
Yes

No matter the situation, you can cancel your purchase and get a refund from the event organizer. The prescribed period begins from the time the sale is concluded until May 13th 2022. En savoir plus

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Qawwali is a musical genre, popular in India and Pakistan, which expresses Sufi devotion. The word literally means “speech music” and originally comes from the Arabic qawwâl, a word meaning, “loquacious, who speaks well, who knows how to speak well”. This form of music has been made very popular in Europe and North America, thanks to the efforts of the inimitable Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, the gifted singer from Pakistan. The genre originated in 14th century India, and its founder was Amir Khusrau Dehlavi. Qawwali songs fall into two groups: hamd or manqabat which are devotional songs dedicated to Allah and ghazal which are secular songs which celebrate wine or love. A traditional qawwali ensemble usually consists of nine men: two lead singers who play the harmonium, five chorus singers who beat time with their hands, a tablâs player, and a dholak drummer. 

The songs usually last about fifteen minutes and are usually arranged in the following format: the main melody is generated on harmoniums, usually with improvised variations on this theme. Then comes an introduction called “âlâp”, where the singers intone different long notes from the râga which serves as a tonic base for the theme played. Then, the lead singer begins to sing the lines of the poem which constitute the lyrics of the song, accompanied by the only harmonium. The sung melodies are improvised following the structure of the chosen raga. After the lead singer's first exposition of the verse, another repeats it to a different improvised melody. A few verses, in varying numbers, are thus sung, so as to lead to the main heart of the song. This is when the song really begins: at this time, the tablâs and the dholak begin to play in rhythm, with the choir singers clapping their hands in rhythm, while all the members of the ensemble join in the singing. worms. The lyrics and the melodies associated with them are usually not improvised and are in fact very popular traditional songs. During the song, the lead singer and backing vocals can improvise a long tonal melody. The song experiences a rise in tempo and pathos, with each singer trying to outdo each other in terms of vocal arabesques. A few singers perform long periods of improvisation on the sargam, often in dialogue with an apprentice singer. Songs usually end abruptly. 

Refunds
Until the event starts
Exchanges
Until the event starts
Access for persons with mobility impairment
Yes

Metro: Berri-UQAM

Paid underground parking, enter on rue Berri.

Abdullah Muhammad Manzoor Niazi Ensemble

Abdullah Muhammad Manzoor Niazi, also referred to as Abdullah Niazi Qawwal, (born 1960) is a Pakistani Qawwal. He belongs to the Qawwal Bachchon Ka Gharana of Delhi. He is the eldest son of Manzoor Niazi Qawwal. Abdullah Niazi was one of the principal Qawwals in Manzoor Niazi Qawwal's group and after the death of Manzoor Niazi Qawwal, he led a Qawwali Group formed with his brothers. In 2015, he branched out with his sons supporting him. His performance style is steeped in Amir Khusro's Kalaam (verses) and has a based on Indian classical music. Abdullah Niazi carries the qawwali performance with a command and virtuosity rarely found in contemporary Qawwals capturing Amir Khusrow's poetry and its musical emotionality in all its subtlety and intensity. Abdullah Niazi Qawwal performs various genres of qawwali music such as Thumri, Khayal, Tarana, Sufism, and Classical. This was all evident in their concert performance at the National Academy of Performing Arts arranged by the All Pakistan Music Conference. Abdullah Niazi Qawwal's grandfather was Mir Qutub Bukhsh who was awarded the title of Tanras Khan by the last Mughal Emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar. Tanras Khan was also the tutor in music and court musician of this emperor. Abdullah Niazi Qawwal learned Qawwali from his late father Manzoor Niazi Qawwal and his late uncle Bahauddin Qawwal. Abdullah Niazi with his three sons Waqas Ahmed, Saad Ahmed, and Fahad Ahmed are now promoting their family's traditional music. They have performed in South Africa, United States, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Muscat, India, Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka and many other countries.